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FREE RADICALS AND ANTIOXIDANTS, 2012; 2(2):12-18
Clinical Research Article | doi:10.5530/ax.2012.2.2.3

Lipid peroxidation and the levels of antioxidant enzymes in hypertension


Authors and affiliation (s):

Mohammad Amanullah,1 Gaffar Sarwar Zaman,2* Jalelur Rahman,3 Sajida Sultana Rahman4

1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

3Department of ENT, Prathima Instiute of Medical Science, Karimnagar, Hyderabad, India

4Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Prathima Instiute of Medical Science, Karimnagar, Hyderabad, India.

Abstract:

Background and Aim: There is substantial evidence that oxidative stress plays a major role in hypertension and subsequently the atherosclerotic process. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of oxidative stress in hypertension. Materials and Methods: The study included 46 hypertensive and 48 control subjects. Superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase activity and malondialdehyde level were measured in serum samples of the participants along with fasting lipid levels. Statistical Analysis Used: All data was entered into an Excel spreadsheet and analyzed using standard statistical software like Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). Chi square test was used for categorical variables. Results: Serum malondialdehyde level was significantly raised in the study group as compared to control group (p < 0.05). Superoxide dismutase activity, whole blood glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase activity were significantly decreased in all the subgroups of study group as compared to control group (p < 0.05). Cholesterol, low density lipoproteins and triglycerides showed significant rise, whereas high density lipoprotein was decreased as compared to normal. Conclusions: The higher malondialdehyde level and lower activity levels of other antioxidant molecules measured in this study could have resulted from increased free radical generation, which may confirm the presence of oxidative stress in hypertension. However, further elaborate clinical studies are required to evaluate the role of such antioxidant enzymes.

Key words: antioxidant, oxidative stress, malondialdehyde, glutathione, superoxide dismutase.

 

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